Research
Women of Color in Business:
cross-generational
survey©

The significant impact of Black and other women of color has been widely acknowledged in a number of fields, among them, politics, sports, medicine and entertainment, but the impact of Black and women of color in business has been studied intermittently and imperfectly until the Women of Color in Business: Cross--Generational Survey©, commissioned for “A Blessing: Women of Color Teaming Up to Lead, Empower and Thrive,” by Bonita C. Stewart and Jacqueline Adams.

Methodology

The 2019 Women of Color in Business: Cross Generational Survey © was conducted by Quadrant Strategies, a leading brand research firm. Quadrant surveyed 4,005 desk workers, who identified as women, including 1,604 African American women, 1,600 Latinx women, 403 Asian women, and 401 white women. Respondents were surveyed from October to November 2019 and were asked 91 questions, based on 13 topics. With a 95% confidence interval, the margin of error for African American women and Latinx women is ±2.45%; the margin of error for Asian women is ±4.88%; and the margin of error for white women is ±4.89%.

The team lead was Senior Consultant Hannah Leverson.

Research
Major Findings
the 2019 Women of Color in Business: Cross-Generational Study©
Generational Diversity

Stewart and Adams have coined the phrase, Generational Diversity, to highlight the nuances that are being overlooked in today’s Diversity and Inclusion conversations. The most important investments a company will make are the people they employ. From their research, the authors found that Gen Z and Millennial workers, especially those of color, are mission-driven, innovative, confident and are demanding workplaces that provide the support they need to thrive. These insights are critical to companies which are developing strategies to retain these workers of color who have, historically, been challenging to source.

Research
The Only

Despite numerous examples of “winning” by women of color, the data showed several disheartening findings. The “Only” still exists in far too many business environments. 47% of Black women, almost half, say they are frequently or always the ONLY person of color in a professional situation. “Unicorns.” By contrast, 73% of white women reported that they are RARELY the only person of their race in a professional setting. The 47% figure is troublesome because “only-ness” has distinct costs.Black women are twice as likely as white women to say that their work is viewed skeptically. 23% of LatinX and 17% of Asian women also held this view.

Research
Praise for "A Blessing:
WOMEN OF COLOR TEAMING UP TO LEAD, EMPOWER AND THRIVE" AND ITS RESEARCH

“A Blessing: Women of Color Teaming Up to Lead, Empower and Thrive,” received acclaim from the Library Journal citing “anyone interested in the role of Black women, and women in general, in business will learn a great deal from this well-argued book.”

Girls
SaaS: Sisters as a Service
Sisterhood
Research Graph
The notion of “sisterhood” - women supporting other women at work - was almost unanimously endorsed by the desk workers in the survey. Teaming Up is a scalable proposition to advancement and to increasing the camaraderie among women of color. The authors call it “SaaS” -- Sisters as a Service. Career growth is at the center of our “flywheel” and it comes from referring others. By supporting referrals, we create strong succession planning for every role leading to the C-suite and a pipeline for venture funding. As women of color, we can create a joyous sense of belonging through career sisterhood and hiring more of us in multiples.
Generational Alliances

When we team up, younger women can provide energy just as older ones provide wisdom. To illustrate what we call “Generational Alliances,” we use a metaphor from the natural world, zebras and ostriches. Zebras can’t see very well but they can SMELL and HEAR predators approaching. Ostriches can’t hear or smell wellbut they do SEE danger ahead. Together, they help one another thrive.

Ostrich
Zebras
Ostrich
#TeamUp
African proverb: If you want to go quickly, go alone.
If you want to go far, go together

"Bonita Stewart and Jacqueline Adams have answered the call to Black Women everywhere to team up and use our special skills, strengths and experiences to take our seat at the table. The knowledge and research in this book provides the blue print for personal and professional growth designed to create change and success for generations of “Blessings” to come."

Girls
Girls

"Bonita Stewart and Jacqueline Adams have answered the call to Black Women everywhere to team up and use our special skills, strengths and experiences to take our seat at the table. The knowledge and research in this book provides the blue print for personal and professional growth designed to create change and success for generations of “Blessings” to come."